Help needed, please read……

It is the end of the year and I realize that you have probably been bombarded with requests for donations and help for several months.


But I will be unusually direct here — We are facing eviction and having to end our information and advising  services,  publications, and exhibition projects


Projects such as a major environmental exhibition that is a call to action with artists from around the world making statements about the current environmental crisis.  additional information at  http://humanities-exchange.org/sample-page/a-wheel-within-a-wheel/

The 2020 updating of information for the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections, to be published on January 19

The Dufy by Design exhibition that is on display now in Japan and will be re-designed and begin a  tour in the US the following year.   The expanded exhibition will highlight Dufy’s work with costume design and the theatre, and the beautiful dresses created by costume designer Anthony Powell for his production of My Fair Lady at the Chatelet in Paris, and the Kirov in St Petersburg


……. If at least 500 people give $12 to the Humanities Exchange  and International Art Alliance, then our financial crisis will be at an end and we can continue to follow through on these projects..


in exchange for your help, I will send you pdfs of the latest publications that will make charming New Year gifts for your friends, family and colleagues


The publications that will be sent to you in digital pdf format:


Edible Architecture               
 An entertaining and delightful gift for your friends — Edible Architecture amazes and celebrates  gingerbread houses around the world, and gives a  fascinating look into a world of exhibitions, competitions, chefs, and creators.

Let’s Hit the Road Again, our new book and traveling exhibition explores the car’s impact on American life and society and  celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile.  A perfect “read” for you and your car loving friends

The International Directory of Corporate Art Collections, 2018 edition.  Highlights information on over 700 art programs in workplaoce settings and non-traditional spaces. This includes corporations, small businesses, partnerships, corporate foundations, airports, municipal transport and metro networks, cruise ships, hotels, and hospitals.  ……..it is simply the best source of information for what is happening with art in business and the workplace.


Please help us by clicking on the payment button below, and donating a small amount.  Every week, several thousands visit our websites to access the information and resources, free from annoying ads.  You can see more informaton on  the websites at …….



The Greenhouse Site
http://thegreenhousesite.com/

It is no longer possible to deny that our planet has become steadily and increasingly toxic, and that we are harming it at our own peril.  It has become essential  for us to stop our wasteful and polluting ways that are damaging our ecosystem, and placing the future and  survival of mankind and all life on this planet at risk.  The blog features articles on new creative initiatives.


The Humanities Exchange
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Founded in 1981, The Humanities Exchange is devoted to  encouraging understanding and mutual respect among cultures around the world through international exchange and the development and touring of  museum exhibitions.


Edible Architecture
http://ediblearchitecture.org/

Read the story of the magical houses, palaces, fairy tales, fantasy villages, and futuristic dwellings — all edible and temptingly aromatic.  …..An entertaining and delightful gift for your friends at Christmas.  Edible Architecture amazes and celebrates the world of Gingerbread Houses around the world, and shows a  fascinating world of exhibitions, competitions, chefs, and creators.


Dufy by Design
http://dufybydesign.com/


Corporate Art Brief
http://www.corporateartbrief.com/

The International Directory highlights information on over 700 art programs in workplaoce settings and non-traditional spaces. This includes corporations, small businesses, partnerships, corporate foundations, airports, municipal transport and metro networks, cruise ships, hotels, and hospitals.
……..it is simply the best source of information for what is happening with art in business and the workplace.  I will send you the last version of 2018.




Let’s Hit the Road Again — The Exhibition

Title of Artwork: Where we have been? Where are we going?  Artist: Romney Shelton Collins

Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?

Experience the Era and Celebrate America’s love affair with the Automobile

Let’s Hit the Road Again, the touring exhibition and companion book explores the car’s impact on American life and society and  celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile. 

During the first decades of the 20th century, the automobile transformed the way we live.

For the first time, people  could now hop into their cars, hit the road and escape from the places and circumstances that bound them.  The car gave people freedom – freedom to travel, freedom to explore, freedom to experience new ways of living.


The automobile transformed America — where we live, how we work, how we travel, what the cities and suburbs look like, our environment – all have been profoundly shaped by the car.

In Let’s Hit the Road Again artists from around the world have recycled discarded metal wheel coverings and hubcaps  — and turned them into fascinating and sometimes controversial artworks.


Take a  trip down memory lane and enjoy how 149 artists from the LandfillArt Collection  have celebrated this unique era .

……… As long as art has existed, some of it has pushed people to look beyond their comfort zones …….  And the exhibition and book opens your eyes a little wider.

 *   *

Artists have long used junkyards and trash heaps as source material.  By taking something discarded, they turned it into something beautiful, compelling or provocative.

The artists represented in the LandfillArt Collection,  have become a community encouraging and supporting the creative reuse and recycling of the earth’s resources.   The artists have explored the potential of re-using materials –   in their hands, workroom scraps, broken dishes, and even recycled paint have become art.  They have turned the ordinary into the extraordinary!

With such a diversity of creative expressions and mediums, the artists created a body of work, that makes us pause, ponder, and plan to make a difference in our own world.

*   *

The following are a few of the surprises and stories that await you in Let’s Hit the Road Again

Title of Artwork: Route 66 Revisited, by Thom Roslan

Explore  the lore and popular culture that surrounds some of the iconic cars, and the well- known highways and byways.  Several highways became outright legends on their own. 

Often called “The Mother Road,” Route 66 became one of the most famous roads in the US.  It originally ran from Chicago, before ending in Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km). 

US 66 served as a primary route for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and the road supported the economies of the communities it passed through.

It was recognized in popular culture by both the hit song “Get Your Kicks on Route 66” and  the Route 66 television show in the 1960s. The song “Get your kicks on Route 66.”became a monument to long-distance car travel..

*   *

Highway 61 North –  known as the “Blues Highway,” rivaled Route 66 as the most famous road in American music lore.  It was a major transit route out of the Deep South particularly for African Americans traveling north to Chicago, St Louis and Memphis.

The highway has a long musical history, being the supposed location where singer-songwriter Robert Johnson made a deal with the Devil for his successes.  The road later gave its name to Minnesota native Bob Dylan’s album Highway 61 Revisited.

 *   *

At its height, one in every six working Americans worked directly for the automobile industry, and Detroit was its epicenter.

Henry Ford in his own words……

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

“Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.”

*   *

Cars of the Stars.   The high end automobiles, such as the Cadillac and Mercedes, became status symbols and were popular with celebrities, and  Hollywood stars. 

By 1910, Cadillac was the first manufacturer to mass-produce cars with enclosed cabins.  They invented climate control.  By 1964, everything on your Caddy could be controlled by thermostat, the first vehicle to ever offer such a cool ride.

The fascinating story behind Al Capone’s infamous getaway car – a Cadillac – that was custom built for him.   The gangster commissioned several armoured cars, but the most famous was a 1928 Cadillac – and thought to be one of the first cars to have body armour and bulletproof glass.

 *   *

The Pierce-Arrow was a status symbol, owned by many Hollywood stars and celebrities.  Most of the royalty of the world had at least one Pierce-Arrow in its collection. 

Actor Sessue Hayakawa, from the film Bridge on the River Kwai, drove a custom-ordered gold-plated Pierce-Arrow.

In 1909, U.S. President William Howard Taft ordered two Pierce-Arrows to be used for state occasions.

 *   *

Many television celebrities were used in car marketing. 

One of the most successful was Dinah Shore .  She was one of the first television celebrities whose name became synonymous with a product   — and during the 50s and early 60s, she was probably most responsible for putting Chevrolet automobiles in the driveways of millions. 

On her TV show she sang “the Chevy jingle” and the song became an anthem for the era; a tune approaching patriotic status.  By 1962-63 Chevy sales alone were more than 2 million a year, and all of the General Motors in those years amounted to half of all vehicles sold in the U.S.



Groucho Marx was another who became identified with a car make.  DeSoto sponsored the popular television game show You Bet Your Life from 1950 – 1958, in which host Groucho Marx urged viewers to visit a DeSoto dealer with the phrase “tell ’em Groucho sent you“, and to “drive a DeSoto before you decide“.  The DeSoto was named for Hernando de Soto to symbolize travel, adventure and pioneering.

 *   *

Title of Artwork: Chief, by James Dobney

Why did Pontiac use an Indian as their symbol.   The earliest Pontiac logos, show a side view of a Native American with a distinctive headdress.  

Pontiac,  or Obwandiyag (c. 1720 – 1769) was an Odawa war chief who led Native Americans in a struggle against British military occupation of the Great Lakes region. 

Pontiac’s War began in May 1763 when Pontiac and 300 followers attempted to take Fort Detroit by surprise.  They laid siege to the fort, where they were joined by more than 900 warriors from a half-dozen tribes.

  *   *

Title:  Chevy to the Levee, By Guinotte Wise

America’s love affair with the automobile was most evident in the music of the era.  

The Day Music Died …. 

So bye-bye, Miss American Pie, Drove my Chevy to the levee, but the levee was dry And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye Singin’ “This’ll be the day that I die, This’ll be the day that I die.”   

Chevy to the levee” is from  “American Pie,” which topped America’s music charts in 1972. Singer and songwriter Don McLean wrote it to mourn the death of three musicians in a 1959 airplane crash. Those who perished the “day the music died” included Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and Jiles Perry Richardson Jr., “the Big Bopper.” The song’s familiar chorus is now part of American pop culture.

“Oh, Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes Benz.”  –Janis Joplin

  *   *

The Volkswagen Beetle is arguably the most recognized industrial product shape ever produced.

But more than that, it has endured for generations, becoming a part of many families’ cultural history.

 *   *

The Jeep

The Jeep is the oldest four-wheel drive mass-production vehicles now known as SUVs.

 

“You know it’s important to have a Jeep in Los Angeles. That front wheel drive is crucial when it starts to snow on Rodeo Drive.” –Christopher Guest

*   *

Tail Fins and the Designers

With America’s passion for the jet age in the 1950s, the public was obsessed with the need to go fast. 

During the 1960s American automobiles came to resemble the jet with it’s tail fins.  Large tailfins,  designs reminiscent of rockets, and radio antennas that imitated Sputnik were common, due to the efforts of design pioneers such as Harley Earl.  So before the 1950s and 1960s were over,  designers were adding fins to every car they could.

“Dad called General Motors designer Harley Earl’s designs “chrome-plated barges,” .. he said that, if left to his own devices, Harley Earl would put fins on a TV or refrigerator.”   Raymond Loewy

 *   *

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Vision of the Future

Frank Lloyd Wright had three loves:   cars, architecture and the American landscape.  His annual road trips to Taliesin helped him refresh his architectural perspectve and vision.  And gave him a clear view of the country’s changing landscape, and how automobiles were transforming American society.

In his architectural projects, he designed many car-influenced  structures that included a filling station, a self-service parking garage, a “paradise on wheels housing project,” and, of course, his Jaguar showroom in New York City.

 *   *

For more information about the exhibition, see   here.   To schedule the exhibition or propose an exhibition site,  please contact Shirley Reiff Howarth at exhibitions@humanities-exchange.org

 *   *

The book, Let’s Hit the Road Again is now available and you cn see a full 182 page preview, with over 230 photographs by clicking on the photograph below:  Order single copies from that preview by clicking on the shopping cart at the top of the preview page

 


Let’s Hit the Road Again

By Shirley Reiff Howarth



Multple copies are available at a discount price:  over 10 copies with a 30% ciscount, and over 20 copies for a 40% discount — contact me for an invoice and shipping costs — srhowarth@humanities-exchange.org


If you would like a digital pdf copy of the entire 180 page book, you can order it here for $9.95, by clicking on the button below that will take you to paypal. When your payment is credited, I will then send you the pdf via wetransfer.

Thank you for your interest




Book Title:  Lets Hit the Road Again

Author: Shirley Reiff Howarth
184 pages, 230 illustrations
ISBN: 978–0–943488-27-1 Paperback
ISBN: 978–0–943488-26-4 Hardbound
Published in the United States of America
Book layout and design ©2019 The Humanities Exchange / Shirley Reiff Howarth
Website: : www.humanities-exchange.org
email:  exhibitions@humanities-exchange.org

Available from The Humanities Exchange,  Shirley Reiff Howarth,
2840 West Bay Drive, # 250, Belleair Bluffs, Florida 33770
Copies can be ordered from the Humanities Exchange website at:
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Quantity sales. Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations,  associations, and others. For details, contact the address above.

Title: Sky High and Riding Low, by Susan Hammond

“I pesently own a Chrysler 300, and each time I drive to work in New York City I pass the beautiful Chrysler Building  I chose to create a hubcap showing antique Chryslers as well as the historic Chrysler Building.”   — Susan Hammond

Folk Art: Celebrating Spring with Decorated Eggs

Pysanky are intricately decorated Ukrainian eggs with symbols. The custom dates back over 2,000 years.

Celebrating Spring with colored eggs !

For thousands of years, the egg has been a powerful and ancient symbol of rebirth and the Spring Equinox  Today,  most historians believe that the holiday of Easter and the practice of decorating and coloring eggshells has its roots in ancient pagan culture.  

Sumerian, Babylonian, Persian, and pre-dynastic Egyptian cultures all celebrated the return of Spring.  These cultural relationships probably influenced early Christian and Islamic cultures in those regions, as they were spread through trade, religion, and political links from the areas around the Mediterranean.

Ostrich egg painted with red lines. Punic artwork found at the Villaricos necropolis in Cuevas del Almanzora (Province of Almeria, Andalusia, Spain), and dated between 6th and 4th centuries BC (Iron Age II). National Archaeological Museum of Spain (Madrid).

60,000 year old engraved ostrich eggshells have been discovered in South Africa , decorated with engraved hatched patterns. There is evidence that, even in ancient Roman culture, eggs decorated with vegetable dyes using onion skins, beets, and carrots were given as gifts during the spring festivals.

In Persia and present day Iran, the celebration of the New Year, incorporates colored eggs as part of the ceremonial Nowruz table. This 13-day spring festival falls on or around the vernal equinox in March and is believed to have originated in modern day Iran as part of the Zoroastrian religion. 

One theory for the name Easter, is that it probably came from Eastre, the Saxon name of the goddess of spring and fertility, Her festival was celebrated on the day of the vernal equinox; traditions associated with the festival survive in the Easter rabbit, a symbol of fertility, and in colored Easter eggs.

Mexican Cascarones

Civilizations worldwide have created rituals to celebrate a fertile spring, a time of renewal, regeneration and resurrection. Newer legends blended folklore and Christian beliefs and like the holiday of Easter itself, the art and craft of decorating eggs with different colors has also evolved over time.

Faberge Egg

The renowned Russian court artist and jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé made exquisitely decorated precious metal and gemstone eggs for the Romanov Dynasty. These Fabergé eggs resembled standard decorated eggs, but they were made from gold and precious stones.

This new book shows the varied sources for the folk art of coloring and decorating eggs, while demonstrating their  complexity in design and symbolism.

Eastern European cultures have exceptionally strong traditions of decorating eggs.  Created for hundreds of years in the Urkraine and other Slavic countries, the  extraordinarily delicate and beautiful  Pysanky eggs are highlighted — their  history and methods of decorating are discussed in the book.

Showing how the cultural traditions have merged and evolved over several thousand years of  history, this is a  book to enjoy with your family.

  • The Egg of Many Cultures:  Transforming a Celebration of the Rites of Spring to Easter
  • ISBN  978-0-943488-15-8
  • EBOOK, 60 pages, fully illustrated, 7″ x 7″
  • Price:     $3.95
  • Order through paypal below:



NOTE FROM THE EDITOR:     When you order the ebook with the  button above,  the download  link will then be sent to you in a separate email.   Please make sure that you are giving the correct email address, otherwise, I cannot reach you.   After you have placed your order, it is sent to me for verification so it may take a couple of hours —   I am in North American  East Coast time zone.


Table of Contents

Part I : History of Decorated Eggs

Colored Eggs – Modern Customs
Decorating Eggs: The Eariest History
Slavic Cultures and the Ukraine : The Pysanky
Mesopotamia and Early Christian Roots
Nowruz: Persian New Year
Early Christian Era-The Byzantine and Roman Church
Legends, Folklore and Superstitions
Mexico : Cascarones
Russia: The Faberge Eggs

Part II : Decorating the Eggs

Dying: Colors Created from Natural Dyes
Wax Resist
The Pysanky
The Technique for Creating Traditional Pysanky
Types of Decorated Eggs
Sharing Pysanky
Folk Symbols and Designs
Color Symbolism
Naturally Colored Eggs

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