How to Survive as an Artist

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Two Resources and a telephone strategy session

  In the strategy session, I work with you to develop a new path or “blueprint” to attract new buyers and expand your audience.

 


We are living in difficult times and it is challenging to survive as an artist and creative person

Everything is uncertain  – 

Erosion of personal freedoms and privacy 

Degradation of the environment and climate change

Pollutants and chemicals in our water and air

Health challenges and chronic disease

Food and the dangers of industrial farming 

Changes in economic and financial realities

Political disruptions

Difficulties in relationships

Every aspect of our lives is under pressure right now

and artists and all creative people are particularly sensitive and intuitive and are feeling this more intensely now than at any other time


Surviving as an Artist

I recently asked some of our community of artists what were the biggest frustrations or challenges they faced as artists.


A common thread emerged from their responses –- the frustration in finding reliable representation and in having their work exhibited or seen –

                “finding someone who has the know how and who could promote my work in the right way, particularly in larger projects or commissions.”  The often expressed desire was to have a sincere partner or agent(s) -– “someone to stand behind you and believe in your work.”

While having total confidence in their own work and in their ability to create, many admitted that their weakest point was being able to promote themselves.



I can help you to develop a strategy to survive as an artist during these uncertain times

As the economy has constricted, artists and other creative people have been some of the most affected, and art acquisitions have been viewed as a luxury that can easily be dismissed as unnecessary.

Creating a work of art is labor intensive, so it is impossible to calculate a price for the “sale value” of a work of art based on the length of time it took to create.  An artist simply cannot “charge by the hour”.


And combining this with the reality of high gallery commissions, many artists have found that with existing fee structures, they wind up paying more than they can sell the artwork for. Another risk is working with the so-called  “vanity galleries” that promise to promote your art and establish your reputation – but in reality are designed to extract money from you offering little in return.

Many reputable gallery owners continue to promote the artists in their stable — and do an excellent job of supporting artists and promoting new talent. But galleries are businesses and need to be profitable to stay in business  —  An important fact you need to keep in mind if you are seeking gallery representation and assistance.


There are alternatives ….

But  there are alternatives to the traditional artist – gallery working relationships.  The huge expansion of social media and the opportunities for communication that the internet  has created, can  increase your visibility, help  you discover new places to exhibit or display your work, and attract new buyers. There are many more options today that can be explored:


  1. Art has become essential in many types of projects and spaces. It can be used as a social connector in the workplace and can forge links with the community.  Other options are…

Working with local arts councils or other commissioning bodies.
Reaching new audiences in airports, hotels, municipal transport authorities.
Creating projects that incorporate community involvement.
Exhibiting in corporate galleries, community centers and other non-traditional spaces.
Artist co-ops.
Museum advisory services.
Art banks and arts counsels, art centers


Two Resources and a telephone strategy session

 As a guide, I can work with you to develop a path or “blueprint” on how to navigate through this period., and develop some strategies for survival



So the basics . The Artist’s Survival Blueprint features:

Insider’s Guide to Art in the Workplace ebook reveals how a corporate curator thinks, how they make their decisions, and how companies run their art programs, It is a synthesis of the insights I’ve gained during the past 50 years of documenting the world of corporate art.

One-hour personal strategy session that will give you a crystal clear vision of how to attract new buyers; will set targets for your promotional plans and uncover hidden challenges that may be sabotaging you and blocking your success 
—you will leave the strategy session renewed, inspired, energized

2020 Edition of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections, the only source of information on over 700 art programs in workplace settings and non-traditional spaces. This is simply the best source of information for what is happening with art in business and the workplace.  2020 edition will be released on February 15.



It is a new way of thinking and a way of noticing opportunities – and that is what the Artist’s Blueprint is for.   I’d like to invite you to take advantage of the Artist’s Strategy Blueprint.

Order the three-part Artist’s Strategy Plan below



Yes, I would like to order the Artist’s Strategy Blueprint that includes the “Insider’s Guide, the personal strategy session, and the 2020 / 2021 Edition of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections for $87.     

Note: the International Directory and Insider’s Guide ebook are in Adobe PDF format that can be used on either PCs or Apple.  

The Directory is currently at a special 30% pre-publication discount price until February 14.  After that the Artist’s Strategy Blueprint will be $99.


NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: When you purchase this three-part artist’s strategy blueprint, you will receive a separate email with information about your order, and a brief questionnaire to schedule the strategy coaching session. Please make sure that you are providing the correct email address, otherwise, I cannot reach you.

After you have placed your order, your name and email address is forwarded to me for checking and verification. It may take a few hours for me to see your order — I am in the North American East Coast time zone.

For more information , contact the Editor at publications@humanities-exchange.org

If you wish to order a printed version of the Directory (550 pages), the charge is an additional $30 plus postage. Contact me at the email address above



 

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Folk Art: Celebrating Spring with Decorated Eggs

Pysanky are intricately decorated Ukrainian eggs with symbols. The custom dates back over 2,000 years.

Celebrating Spring with colored eggs !

For thousands of years, the egg has been a powerful and ancient symbol of rebirth and the Spring Equinox  Today,  most historians believe that the holiday of Easter and the practice of decorating and coloring eggshells has its roots in ancient pagan culture.  

Sumerian, Babylonian, Persian, and pre-dynastic Egyptian cultures all celebrated the return of Spring.  These cultural relationships probably influenced early Christian and Islamic cultures in those regions, as they were spread through trade, religion, and political links from the areas around the Mediterranean.

Ostrich egg painted with red lines. Punic artwork found at the Villaricos necropolis in Cuevas del Almanzora (Province of Almeria, Andalusia, Spain), and dated between 6th and 4th centuries BC (Iron Age II). National Archaeological Museum of Spain (Madrid).

60,000 year old engraved ostrich eggshells have been discovered in South Africa , decorated with engraved hatched patterns. There is evidence that, even in ancient Roman culture, eggs decorated with vegetable dyes using onion skins, beets, and carrots were given as gifts during the spring festivals.

In Persia and present day Iran, the celebration of the New Year, incorporates colored eggs as part of the ceremonial Nowruz table. This 13-day spring festival falls on or around the vernal equinox in March and is believed to have originated in modern day Iran as part of the Zoroastrian religion. 

One theory for the name Easter, is that it probably came from Eastre, the Saxon name of the goddess of spring and fertility, Her festival was celebrated on the day of the vernal equinox; traditions associated with the festival survive in the Easter rabbit, a symbol of fertility, and in colored Easter eggs.

Mexican Cascarones

Civilizations worldwide have created rituals to celebrate a fertile spring, a time of renewal, regeneration and resurrection. Newer legends blended folklore and Christian beliefs and like the holiday of Easter itself, the art and craft of decorating eggs with different colors has also evolved over time.

Faberge Egg

The renowned Russian court artist and jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé made exquisitely decorated precious metal and gemstone eggs for the Romanov Dynasty. These Fabergé eggs resembled standard decorated eggs, but they were made from gold and precious stones.

This new book shows the varied sources for the folk art of coloring and decorating eggs, while demonstrating their  complexity in design and symbolism.

Eastern European cultures have exceptionally strong traditions of decorating eggs.  Created for hundreds of years in the Urkraine and other Slavic countries, the  extraordinarily delicate and beautiful  Pysanky eggs are highlighted — their  history and methods of decorating are discussed in the book.

Showing how the cultural traditions have merged and evolved over several thousand years of  history, this is a  book to enjoy with your family.

  • The Egg of Many Cultures:  Transforming a Celebration of the Rites of Spring to Easter
  • ISBN  978-0-943488-15-8
  • EBOOK, 60 pages, fully illustrated, 7″ x 7″
  • Price:     $3.95
  • Order through paypal below:



NOTE FROM THE EDITOR:     When you order the ebook with the  button above,  the download  link will then be sent to you in a separate email.   Please make sure that you are giving the correct email address, otherwise, I cannot reach you.   After you have placed your order, it is sent to me for verification so it may take a couple of hours —   I am in North American  East Coast time zone.


Table of Contents

Part I : History of Decorated Eggs

Colored Eggs – Modern Customs
Decorating Eggs: The Eariest History
Slavic Cultures and the Ukraine : The Pysanky
Mesopotamia and Early Christian Roots
Nowruz: Persian New Year
Early Christian Era-The Byzantine and Roman Church
Legends, Folklore and Superstitions
Mexico : Cascarones
Russia: The Faberge Eggs

Part II : Decorating the Eggs

Dying: Colors Created from Natural Dyes
Wax Resist
The Pysanky
The Technique for Creating Traditional Pysanky
Types of Decorated Eggs
Sharing Pysanky
Folk Symbols and Designs
Color Symbolism
Naturally Colored Eggs

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A Holiday Tradition: The Magic of Gingerbread Houses

Just in time for the holidays — a look at the tradition, the customs, the history, and the enthusiastic competitions. 


Every year thousands of pounds of flour, sugar, ginger, and candies are used to create magical houses, palaces, fairy tales, fantasy villages, and futuristic structures — all edible and temptingly aromatic.


Alice in Wonderland, from the Seattle Sheraton 2012 Display, Once Upon a Time.

Edible Architecture is the story of gingerbread houses — their link to the popular fairy tale Hansel and Grelel, the enthusiastic and highly competitive contests sponsored every year, the Guiness record breakers creating the largest houses or gingerbread villages, the traditions that are celebrated around the world, and the chefs that create these fantasy palaces from hundreds of pounds of flour, sugar, ginger, and candy.


Gingerbread houses have surged in popularity and it’s not too difficult to understand why. “Gingerbread House-making” combines the skills of baker, architect and visionary. For a family-designed gingerbread house, it takes many hands—both adult and child-size to construct the dream home. During the holiday season of sugar plum fairies and other food-related enchantment, it’s the perfect time to blend spices and flour to create a cookie palace.

The tradition of making decorated gingerbread houses probably began in Germany during the early 1800s, and was closely linked to the fairy tale of Hansel and Gretel.



But no-one seems to know for certain if making Gingerbread Houses was inspired by the story of Hansel and Gretel, or the reverse — if Gingerbread Houses were already being made and inspired the tale.


Since the 1950s, it has been a White House tradition to have a special gingerbread houe for the enjoyment of the thousands of visitors during the holiday period.  In the last year of Barack Obama’s presidency in 2016, over 68,000 visitors and guests were entertained at the White House.


North Americans have been baking gingerbread for over 200 years, and even George Washington’s mother is credited with a recipe. The tradition of gingerbread baking was brought to the New World by the German-speaking communities of Pennsylvania and Maryland, and pastries were baked as ginger snap cookies and became popular as Christmas tree decorations.


Gingerbread house competitions have been popular in the US and Canada for over 20 years. 


The largest is spnsored by the Grove Park Inn in Ashville, North Carolina.  It attracts over 400 of the best designers from across the country every year.


Even the Guiness World Records have gotten into the excitement and their Largest Gingerbread House broke the world record in 2013 built by the Texas A&M Traditions Club in Bryan Texas,  The huge structure had an internal volume of 1,110 square meeters, length of 160 feet, and was 42 feet wide.  Covering an area of 2,520 square feet, the 21 foot ingerbread housee had an edible exterior mounted over a wooden frame.


For further information or orders of softbound and hardbound edition  please contact us at: exhibitions@humanities-exchange.org

Edible Architecture is available on Amazon in a Kindle Edition.

If you would like to buy the 120 page PDF edition of Edible Architecture for $4.95, please click on the button below





Bergen, Norway annual Gingerbread Village

Suddenly It’s Halloween !

Is it only a time for fun, putting on costumes, and trick-or-treating, or is it more?

Halloween is also a world of superstition, ancient myth, ghosts, and evil spirits

A book for the whole family to enjoy

Explore the the customs

the foods

the games

and the origins. 

 

And experience its ancient  myths and traditions


Halloween is surrounded with a world of superstition, ghosts, goblins and evil spirits that are to be avoided!



Its origins can be traced back over 2000 years to the Druids, and the Celtic culture in Ireland, Britain and Northern Europe.  Its roots lay in the feast of Samhain, which honored the dead on October 31st.

At this time, the souls of the dead were supposed to revisit their homes, and the autumn festival acquired sinister significance, with ghosts, witches, goblins, black cats, fairies and demons of all kinds said to be roaming about the streets and villages at night.


 What about the witches?

They are the most mysterious entities associated  with Halloween. The word Witch comes from the word “Wicca” meaning “Wise One.”

When did they become feared and avoided?   

And why did they evolve into an ugly, hook-nosed woman, stirring up a steaming potion that is brewing away inside a cauldron?

Modern-day witches of the Western World still struggle to shake this historical stereotype. Most practice Wicca, an official religion, and Wiccans avoid evil and the appearance of evil at all costs. Their motto is to “harm none,” and they strive to live a peaceful, tolerant and balanced life in tune with nature and humanity.

Many modern-day witches still perform witchcraft, but there’s seldom anything sinister about it. Their spells and incantations are often derived from their Book of Shadows, a 20th-century collection of wisdom and witchcraft.  A modern-day witchcraft potion is more likely to be an herbal remedy for the flu instead of a hex to harm someone.



Explore the divinations and  fortune-telling of Halloween 


This is thought to be the most favourable time for divinations on marriage, luck, health, and death.

Many of these practices evolved from the celebration of Samhain — such as reading apple peels, interpreting the movements of roasted nuts and counting crows all were used to find answers to questions about children, fortune and love.

The Druids believed that the particular shape of various fruits and vegetables could help predict, or divine, the future.


The practice of fortunetelling carried over into America with activities like bobbing for apples, where unmarried young adults would take turns trying to bite an apple, either hanging from a tree or floating in water, without the use of their hands. The first person to bite into an apple would supposedly be the next to marry. Young women would also peel apples onto the ground in hopes of seeing their future husband’s name spelled out in the peels.



Ghosts and evil spirits

In Ireland especially, people thought that ghosts and spirits roamed after dark on Halloween — when mischievous and evil spirits roamed, and the mischievous spirits could play tricks on the living.

They lit candles or lanterns to keep the spirits away, and if they had to go outside, they wore costumes and masks to frighten the spirits or  “hide” from them  to keep from being recognized by the unearthly.




In Mexico, the Dia de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, celebrates and honors friend and family members who have passed away. 

 It is said to be the time that heaven’s gates are opened and the spirits of loved ones are able to reunite with their friends and families.



Read the stories and rhymes about Halloween.

What about the Jack-O-Lantern — who was Jack

And enjoy the food traditions, some with ancient origins.  Pumpkins are carved, kids bob for apples, and candy is consumed in massive quantities – a lot of candy.  

In fact, the amount of candy eaten on Halloween has long surpassed the amount eaten at Christmas and Valentine’s Day. In 2011, $2.3 billion was spent on Halloween candy – that is a lot of sugar!

Today Halloween has gone from an informal affair to a holiday celebrated by millions of people. In the US, as much as $6 billion is spent annually on Halloween merchandise, and Halloween commercials fill the airwaves as early as September.


 


Experience all of this in our new book – Into the Heart of Halloween.  All of these topics and more.  Chapters include:

  • Worldwide Traditions
  • Origins in Samhain
  • Growth in North America
  • Customs – trick or treating, jack-o-lanterns,
  • Mexico: Day of the Dead
  • Festivals Around the World
  • A world of superstitions, ghosts, goblins and evil spirits
  • Witches, Magic and Divination
  • Foods of Halloween
  • Children’s Rhymes and Songs

A pdf copy of the book is available for $2.49.  Click on the paynow button below.  After payment has been credited by paypal, the ebook will be sent, so allow about 12 hours to receive it and make sure that you use the email where you would like to receive it.

In the Heart of Halloween – The Origins, Foods, and Customs

For further information the email address is transformations@humanities-exchange.org